gh.abravanelhall.net
New recipes

20 Surprising Reasons You’re Always Tired Slideshow

20 Surprising Reasons You’re Always Tired Slideshow


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Even if you’re sleeping the full 8 hours, these common causes could be giving you fatigue

istockphoto.com

20 Surprising Reasons You’re Always Tired

istockphoto.com

When you don’t get enough sleep, you know why you’re tired. Doctors have been recommending eight hours since before you were born.

But we’re not here to advise you on that obvious solution. Every now and then, there are those times when you tried so hard and you did it: You got your full night’s sleep. And yet when you woke up and made it to work, you were immediately exhausted.

There are perfectly logical reasons why you’re feeling this way, even after you got all that rest.

Fatigue can really put a damper on your day. It makes tedious, mountainous ordeals out of small tasks and can turn a simple conversation into a laborious chore. You live a full, busy life — you need all the energy you can get. We understand that you can’t afford to be dragging all day, and that feeling well rested is crucial for making it through your packed schedule.

It’s likely that your lifestyle is secretly robbing you of your energy without you even knowing it. Are you making any of these mistakes that set you up for hours of exhaustion?

You Beat Yourself Up

istockphoto.com

We criticize ourselves constantly, both out loud and in our heads. It’s time to stop the negative self-talk. Not only is it unproductive (and frankly, hurtful), it’s also making you exhausted. Not just mentally, but physically, too.

We’re talking about all the negative things you say to yourself, including seemingly benign negative comments like “I need to do this better,” or “I really need to lose weight.” All that mindless chatter floating around your head telling you you’re not good enough adds up quickly and can take a toll on your mental health. A suffering mental health can result in some very real physical symptoms, including tiredness.

If you’re having trouble staying positive, try meditating or taking some time for self-care. Even the smallest changes can make a world of a difference.

You Cut Carbs

istockphoto.com

Carbs are the body’s favorite source of energy. So if you’re cutting carbs, you’re literally depriving your body of the energizing foods it craves. This can leave you feeling sluggish and drained, even after you’ve eaten a large meal.

Incorporate more healthy sources of carbs that give you lasting energy if you’re feeling tired. Some good options include oatmeal, whole wheat bread, grains, and potatoes.

You Don’t Drink Enough Water

You Drink Before Bed

dreamstime.com

Drinking before bed is an all-too-common blunder for insomniacs and night owls alike. The dose of alcohol might serve its purpose to help you fall asleep, but it’s robbing you of the precious quality of your slumber.

In fact, Web MD found a whopping 27 studies that conclude alcohol is disruptive to your natural sleep cycle. After drinking, your body has a more difficult time finding and remaining in REM sleep, which is when you derive the most rest. If you do rely on alcohol to fall asleep, consider trying a more natural sleep aid instead.

You Exercise Too Much

It doesn’t matter how much sleep you’re getting — if you overdo it with the workouts, your body is going to be exhausted. Over-exercise, a practice where you neglect to take days off from the gym and work yourself to near exhaustion, is often revealed in chronic symptoms of tiredness such as fatigue and headaches.

One study found that intense exercise dramatically increased the levels of fatigue in persons of all levels of fitness. The more intense the exercise, the more severe the exhaustion.

Of course, moderate exercise has been proven time and time again to supercharge your energy and leave you feeling more energetic than ever — just make sure you take some days off, too, and listen to your body. If you’re tired or sore, the healthiest option is to skip the workout.

You Have a Fatigue-Related Disorder

istockphoto.com

Both chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and adrenal fatigue often go undiagnosed for this exact reason: Sufferers believe their tiredness is normal or simply a symptom of lack of sleep. However, these conditions are debilitating and very real. Fatigue symptoms of CFS are intense, and often insurmountable. Unfortunately, there is no known treatment or cure.

Adrenal fatigue, on the other hand, varies in severity. According to Dr. Axe, adrenal fatigue is believed to affect up to 80 percent of adults worldwide. It’s caused by hormone imbalances and disruptions, and can be treated with a number of natural and holistic remedies.

You Have an Iron Deficiency

istockphoto.com

Anemia, a condition where red blood cells require more iron to effectively carry oxygen, has a number of causes and can result in intense feelings of weakness and fatigue. The deficiency is surprisingly common, especially in women on their menstrual cycle.

This deficiency has an easy fix: Just eat more iron. Foods such as spinach, kidney beans, beef, and nuts have lots of it, and it’s probably a good idea to eat more of these healthy foods anyway.

You Have an Undiagnosed Thyroid Disorder

You Have Anxiety

istockphoto.com

Mental health has so much control over physical health — including our energy levels. When a person is anxious, their adrenaline is running on high. When adrenaline runs out, it causes a crash that feels like fatigue.

Additionally, brooding tension and circulating worries can lead to feelings of tiredness, simply because your busy brain and tense muscles can get worn down from overuse.

Practicing methods to reduce anxiety can help relieve this tiredness and fatigue by stopping the cause at its source. Consult a mental health professional or try a few home remedies if you think you’re affected.

You Have Fluctuating Blood Sugar Levels

istockphoto.com

Ever heard of a sugar crash? Despite the fact that you can’t really get a sugar high, there is some logic behind the crash. When you eat a large amount of simple carbohydrates, your blood glucose spikes. Then, once the body quickly processes the extra energy, you experience a crash. The rise and fall of blood sugar can be chaotic for your body and your perceived energy, resulting in you feeling frequently tired.

You Refuse to Eat Before Bed

You Rely On Caffeine

istockphoto.com

Coffee wakes you up in the moment, but that jolt is a short-term fix to a long-term problem. Additionally, the frequent caffeine could serve to exacerbate the problem and make your natural energy cycles worse.

Caffeine is a blocker for the chemical adenosine, responsible for signaling sleep. If you don’t build up enough of it, you’re less likely to feel it when you really should be hitting the hay. As you could probably guess, this sets you up for staying up later than you should be for optimal rest. Try one of these coffee alternatives instead to jolt yourself awake when you need it — and lay off when you don’t.

You Skip Breakfast

istockphoto.com

You Spend Too Much Time Inside

istockphoto.com

Office jobs and entire days indoors can be detrimental to a person’s health, including their energy levels. Sitting all day makes you lethargic, and it turns out that the lack of fresh air can do a number on you, as well. According to a series of studies conducted at the University of Rochester, spending time outdoors can boost feelings of both physical and mental energy by nearly 40 percent.

Get your vitamin D any way you can, whether that’s going for a walk on your lunch break or sitting on the porch after you get home.

You Use Technology Before Bed

Watching Netflix before bed is doing more than just keeping you up to watch another episode. Looking at a computer or other screen before bed has been shown to disrupt production of melatonin, an important sleep hormone.

It’s not just computers, either. TVs, phones, and even electronic reading devices all emit harsh light that disrupts your sleep. Set a bedtime for technology at least a few hours before your actual bedtime. You’ll likely fall asleep faster and sleep better if you do!

You’re Depressed

You’re Disorganized

You’re on a Diet

A calorie deficit is a deficit of energy in your body, by definition. If you’re restricting the calories you eat, you’re restricting the energy you have, too. Of course, overeating can also result in a decline in energy. The best way to eat is the way that works for you and your hunger. Both ignoring and overindulging hunger put stress on your mind and your body!

Many diets also exclude certain groups of foods — and therefore certain nutrients. Any nutrient deficiency — whether it’s a lack of fat, protein, carbs, or micronutrients — can result in fatigue because your body has to work harder with smaller amounts of fuel. The most energizing diet? The diet that incorporates all foods.

You’re Sedentary

Rest can be helpful sometimes, but if all you’re ever doing is resting there can be consequences. Living a sedentary lifestyle causes sluggishness and resistance to movement over time. In one study conducted at the University of Georgia, sedentary adults who incorporated even minimal amounts of movement every day felt more energized and much less fatigued after six weeks.

You’ve Had to Make Some Big Decisions Lately

istockphoto.com


8 Surprising Reasons You're Tired

The source of your sleepiness could be a tiny organ near your throat that you may have never even thought about: your thyroid. According to recent estimates, 10 million Americans&mdashand as many as 10 percent of women&mdashhave hypothyroidism, a condition that can lead to hair loss, weight gain and fatigue. "Fatigue arises from a lack of thyroid hormone in the body, resulting in a decline in overall metabolic rate," says Pam Peeke, MD, author of Body for Life for Women. "Metabolism is like the body's battery. If you lack the thyroid hormone, your battery is slowly drained, and lack of energy is one of the first symptoms noted."

What to do? If you're feeling fatigued, talk to your doctor about the possibility of a thyroid issue. "It is easily detected by a simple blood test that determines the level of thyroid hormone as well as its master hormone." Treatment, usually daily replacement hormones, is inexpensive and noninvasive. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #2: Undiagnosed Depression

The reason you're feeling a lack of energy may have more to do with your mood than your body. Depression is the number-one risk factor for sleepiness and fatigue, says John Sharpe, MD, a Harvard psychiatrist and author of the new book The Emotional Calendar. And sometimes, he adds, this is how a depressive episode presents&mdashwith sudden drops in energy levels and an interest in sleeping more.

What to do? If you're experiencing persistent tiredness and little zest for life, talk to your doctor. She may want to refer you to a mental healthcare provider who can prescribe medication that boosts your mood and your energy levels. Photo: Thinkstock

Reason #3: Undiagnosed Sleep Disorder

You go to bed at a reasonable hour in order to get your full 8 hours of sleep, so why do you wake up exhausted? The answer could be a sleep disorder like sleep apnea, say experts, which causes poor, disrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep apnea affects as many as 20 percent of people who snore, and about 4 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 60. "Symptoms that should alert a woman include excessive daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, waking up in the morning feeling exhausted, having trouble with memory and concentration, morning or night headaches, episodes where you stop breathing, tossing and turning throughout the night, and nighttime choking or gasping."

What to do? Talk to your doctor about being referred to a sleep specialist. "The diagnosis is made by an evaluation of sleep test results," says Dr. Peeke. "A specialized mask that delivers oxygen during sleep is the traditional mode of therapy. Since a large number of people who have sleep apnea are obese, weight reduction is highly encouraged to alleviate if not reverse the condition." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #4: An Untreated Urinary Tract Infection

While pain, burning and irritability are the most common signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), some people's symptoms aren't as obvious. In fact, some women only feel tiredness or fatigue when a UTI hits. "Sometimes a UTI will present in a subtle way," explains Dr. Peeke. "Feeling tired and drained is common. This occurs because the woman is harboring an infection in her bladder, which creates a state of inflammation. This sets into motion a host of immune defenses, one of which results in the secretion of interleukins, white cells that can cause a feeling of fatigue."

What to do? If you suspect a UTI, see your doctor. "The diagnosis is made by an examination of a urine sample, looking for bacteria and red blood cells," she says. "The classic treatment is use of an antibiotic, encouragement to drink plenty of water to wash the infection through the bladder, and possibly a urethral anesthetizing medication to decrease the discomfort and frequency associated with urination." Photo: Shutterstock

What you put in your mouth has a direct correlation to your energy level, say experts. Not only are sufficient calories and protein necessary for optimum energy, but nutrients, like iron, are also important. And if you're not getting enough, you may be feeling fatigue. "Food is the fuel for our bodies, and without it they cannot function properly," says Keri Gans, RD, a New York&ndashbased dietitian and author of The Small Change Diet, who notes that two of the most common causes of fatigue are not eating enough and not eating the right foods. "If you lack iron in your diet, your body won't produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enable them to carry oxygen to your cells," she explains. "Too little iron and you could develop anemia, which can leave you feeling weak and tired."

What to do? Make sure you're eating three balanced meals a day, and two healthy snacks. And, to make sure you're getting enough iron, eat plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, iron-fortified cereals, whole-grain breads and pasta, nuts and seeds, beans, eggs, poultry and seafood, suggests Gans. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #6: Undiagnosed Food Allergy or Intolerance

Feeling sluggish? A growing number of health experts believe that fatigue may be a sign of an undiagnosed food allergy, such as the intolerance to wheat and gluten known as celiac disease. "Food intolerances can tax a woman's system because when the allergen is ingested, it can cause inflammation and a defensive reaction from her immune system," notes Dr. Peeke. "Allergies can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, from skin rashes, gastrointestinal bloating and pain to nausea and fatigue."

What to do? "If there is any concern about food allergies, a woman should consult her physician and work with her medical team to uncover the specific allergen," she explains. "The testing is fairly precise and will require her to modify her dietary intake during the evaluation. Treatment entails avoidance of any food that triggers a reaction." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #7: Too Much Caffeine

You drink coffee to rev up your energy, not drag you down. But too much java can have the opposite effect, say experts. "A normal amount of coffee includes 200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine, or roughly 2 to 4 cups of brewed coffee per day," says Dr. Peeke. "Once you're consuming 500 to 600 mg per day (5 to 7 cups), you can run into trouble." Some overcaffeinated symptoms include insomnia, irritability, headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

What to do? Consider switching to tea, which contains less caffeine yet can still give you a boost in the morning or afternoon. And get moving, says Dr. Peeke. "Doing physical activity, especially if it's intense, can rev up a woman's norepinephrine (adrenaline) and energize her." Also, when you need a boost, try having a glass of cold water&mdashnature's gentle way of energizing your body! Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #8: Little to Look Forward To

Everyone deals with peaks and valleys in their lives, but if your life consists of more valleys than peaks right now, it could affect your motivation, happiness and even energy. "You might be tired and dispirited because you don't have anything to look forward to," says Caroline Miller, MAPP, a life coach and the author of Creating Your Best Life. "Happy people tend to have a 'savoring' personality, which means that they often are anticipating pleasurable events, and their calendars are studded with parties, mini-trips, and outings with people who make them smile."

What to do? If you don't have much happening on the horizon, consider doing some goal-setting. "The happiest among us always wake up to clear-cut, challenging goals, according to groundbreaking research published in 2008," says Miller. "It's important that the goals take us out of our comfort zone, because efforts to accomplish those goals are what we tend to value most at the end of the day, and that elevates our self-esteem." Photo: Shutterstock


8 Surprising Reasons You're Tired

The source of your sleepiness could be a tiny organ near your throat that you may have never even thought about: your thyroid. According to recent estimates, 10 million Americans&mdashand as many as 10 percent of women&mdashhave hypothyroidism, a condition that can lead to hair loss, weight gain and fatigue. "Fatigue arises from a lack of thyroid hormone in the body, resulting in a decline in overall metabolic rate," says Pam Peeke, MD, author of Body for Life for Women. "Metabolism is like the body's battery. If you lack the thyroid hormone, your battery is slowly drained, and lack of energy is one of the first symptoms noted."

What to do? If you're feeling fatigued, talk to your doctor about the possibility of a thyroid issue. "It is easily detected by a simple blood test that determines the level of thyroid hormone as well as its master hormone." Treatment, usually daily replacement hormones, is inexpensive and noninvasive. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #2: Undiagnosed Depression

The reason you're feeling a lack of energy may have more to do with your mood than your body. Depression is the number-one risk factor for sleepiness and fatigue, says John Sharpe, MD, a Harvard psychiatrist and author of the new book The Emotional Calendar. And sometimes, he adds, this is how a depressive episode presents&mdashwith sudden drops in energy levels and an interest in sleeping more.

What to do? If you're experiencing persistent tiredness and little zest for life, talk to your doctor. She may want to refer you to a mental healthcare provider who can prescribe medication that boosts your mood and your energy levels. Photo: Thinkstock

Reason #3: Undiagnosed Sleep Disorder

You go to bed at a reasonable hour in order to get your full 8 hours of sleep, so why do you wake up exhausted? The answer could be a sleep disorder like sleep apnea, say experts, which causes poor, disrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep apnea affects as many as 20 percent of people who snore, and about 4 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 60. "Symptoms that should alert a woman include excessive daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, waking up in the morning feeling exhausted, having trouble with memory and concentration, morning or night headaches, episodes where you stop breathing, tossing and turning throughout the night, and nighttime choking or gasping."

What to do? Talk to your doctor about being referred to a sleep specialist. "The diagnosis is made by an evaluation of sleep test results," says Dr. Peeke. "A specialized mask that delivers oxygen during sleep is the traditional mode of therapy. Since a large number of people who have sleep apnea are obese, weight reduction is highly encouraged to alleviate if not reverse the condition." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #4: An Untreated Urinary Tract Infection

While pain, burning and irritability are the most common signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), some people's symptoms aren't as obvious. In fact, some women only feel tiredness or fatigue when a UTI hits. "Sometimes a UTI will present in a subtle way," explains Dr. Peeke. "Feeling tired and drained is common. This occurs because the woman is harboring an infection in her bladder, which creates a state of inflammation. This sets into motion a host of immune defenses, one of which results in the secretion of interleukins, white cells that can cause a feeling of fatigue."

What to do? If you suspect a UTI, see your doctor. "The diagnosis is made by an examination of a urine sample, looking for bacteria and red blood cells," she says. "The classic treatment is use of an antibiotic, encouragement to drink plenty of water to wash the infection through the bladder, and possibly a urethral anesthetizing medication to decrease the discomfort and frequency associated with urination." Photo: Shutterstock

What you put in your mouth has a direct correlation to your energy level, say experts. Not only are sufficient calories and protein necessary for optimum energy, but nutrients, like iron, are also important. And if you're not getting enough, you may be feeling fatigue. "Food is the fuel for our bodies, and without it they cannot function properly," says Keri Gans, RD, a New York&ndashbased dietitian and author of The Small Change Diet, who notes that two of the most common causes of fatigue are not eating enough and not eating the right foods. "If you lack iron in your diet, your body won't produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enable them to carry oxygen to your cells," she explains. "Too little iron and you could develop anemia, which can leave you feeling weak and tired."

What to do? Make sure you're eating three balanced meals a day, and two healthy snacks. And, to make sure you're getting enough iron, eat plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, iron-fortified cereals, whole-grain breads and pasta, nuts and seeds, beans, eggs, poultry and seafood, suggests Gans. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #6: Undiagnosed Food Allergy or Intolerance

Feeling sluggish? A growing number of health experts believe that fatigue may be a sign of an undiagnosed food allergy, such as the intolerance to wheat and gluten known as celiac disease. "Food intolerances can tax a woman's system because when the allergen is ingested, it can cause inflammation and a defensive reaction from her immune system," notes Dr. Peeke. "Allergies can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, from skin rashes, gastrointestinal bloating and pain to nausea and fatigue."

What to do? "If there is any concern about food allergies, a woman should consult her physician and work with her medical team to uncover the specific allergen," she explains. "The testing is fairly precise and will require her to modify her dietary intake during the evaluation. Treatment entails avoidance of any food that triggers a reaction." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #7: Too Much Caffeine

You drink coffee to rev up your energy, not drag you down. But too much java can have the opposite effect, say experts. "A normal amount of coffee includes 200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine, or roughly 2 to 4 cups of brewed coffee per day," says Dr. Peeke. "Once you're consuming 500 to 600 mg per day (5 to 7 cups), you can run into trouble." Some overcaffeinated symptoms include insomnia, irritability, headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

What to do? Consider switching to tea, which contains less caffeine yet can still give you a boost in the morning or afternoon. And get moving, says Dr. Peeke. "Doing physical activity, especially if it's intense, can rev up a woman's norepinephrine (adrenaline) and energize her." Also, when you need a boost, try having a glass of cold water&mdashnature's gentle way of energizing your body! Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #8: Little to Look Forward To

Everyone deals with peaks and valleys in their lives, but if your life consists of more valleys than peaks right now, it could affect your motivation, happiness and even energy. "You might be tired and dispirited because you don't have anything to look forward to," says Caroline Miller, MAPP, a life coach and the author of Creating Your Best Life. "Happy people tend to have a 'savoring' personality, which means that they often are anticipating pleasurable events, and their calendars are studded with parties, mini-trips, and outings with people who make them smile."

What to do? If you don't have much happening on the horizon, consider doing some goal-setting. "The happiest among us always wake up to clear-cut, challenging goals, according to groundbreaking research published in 2008," says Miller. "It's important that the goals take us out of our comfort zone, because efforts to accomplish those goals are what we tend to value most at the end of the day, and that elevates our self-esteem." Photo: Shutterstock


8 Surprising Reasons You're Tired

The source of your sleepiness could be a tiny organ near your throat that you may have never even thought about: your thyroid. According to recent estimates, 10 million Americans&mdashand as many as 10 percent of women&mdashhave hypothyroidism, a condition that can lead to hair loss, weight gain and fatigue. "Fatigue arises from a lack of thyroid hormone in the body, resulting in a decline in overall metabolic rate," says Pam Peeke, MD, author of Body for Life for Women. "Metabolism is like the body's battery. If you lack the thyroid hormone, your battery is slowly drained, and lack of energy is one of the first symptoms noted."

What to do? If you're feeling fatigued, talk to your doctor about the possibility of a thyroid issue. "It is easily detected by a simple blood test that determines the level of thyroid hormone as well as its master hormone." Treatment, usually daily replacement hormones, is inexpensive and noninvasive. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #2: Undiagnosed Depression

The reason you're feeling a lack of energy may have more to do with your mood than your body. Depression is the number-one risk factor for sleepiness and fatigue, says John Sharpe, MD, a Harvard psychiatrist and author of the new book The Emotional Calendar. And sometimes, he adds, this is how a depressive episode presents&mdashwith sudden drops in energy levels and an interest in sleeping more.

What to do? If you're experiencing persistent tiredness and little zest for life, talk to your doctor. She may want to refer you to a mental healthcare provider who can prescribe medication that boosts your mood and your energy levels. Photo: Thinkstock

Reason #3: Undiagnosed Sleep Disorder

You go to bed at a reasonable hour in order to get your full 8 hours of sleep, so why do you wake up exhausted? The answer could be a sleep disorder like sleep apnea, say experts, which causes poor, disrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep apnea affects as many as 20 percent of people who snore, and about 4 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 60. "Symptoms that should alert a woman include excessive daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, waking up in the morning feeling exhausted, having trouble with memory and concentration, morning or night headaches, episodes where you stop breathing, tossing and turning throughout the night, and nighttime choking or gasping."

What to do? Talk to your doctor about being referred to a sleep specialist. "The diagnosis is made by an evaluation of sleep test results," says Dr. Peeke. "A specialized mask that delivers oxygen during sleep is the traditional mode of therapy. Since a large number of people who have sleep apnea are obese, weight reduction is highly encouraged to alleviate if not reverse the condition." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #4: An Untreated Urinary Tract Infection

While pain, burning and irritability are the most common signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), some people's symptoms aren't as obvious. In fact, some women only feel tiredness or fatigue when a UTI hits. "Sometimes a UTI will present in a subtle way," explains Dr. Peeke. "Feeling tired and drained is common. This occurs because the woman is harboring an infection in her bladder, which creates a state of inflammation. This sets into motion a host of immune defenses, one of which results in the secretion of interleukins, white cells that can cause a feeling of fatigue."

What to do? If you suspect a UTI, see your doctor. "The diagnosis is made by an examination of a urine sample, looking for bacteria and red blood cells," she says. "The classic treatment is use of an antibiotic, encouragement to drink plenty of water to wash the infection through the bladder, and possibly a urethral anesthetizing medication to decrease the discomfort and frequency associated with urination." Photo: Shutterstock

What you put in your mouth has a direct correlation to your energy level, say experts. Not only are sufficient calories and protein necessary for optimum energy, but nutrients, like iron, are also important. And if you're not getting enough, you may be feeling fatigue. "Food is the fuel for our bodies, and without it they cannot function properly," says Keri Gans, RD, a New York&ndashbased dietitian and author of The Small Change Diet, who notes that two of the most common causes of fatigue are not eating enough and not eating the right foods. "If you lack iron in your diet, your body won't produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enable them to carry oxygen to your cells," she explains. "Too little iron and you could develop anemia, which can leave you feeling weak and tired."

What to do? Make sure you're eating three balanced meals a day, and two healthy snacks. And, to make sure you're getting enough iron, eat plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, iron-fortified cereals, whole-grain breads and pasta, nuts and seeds, beans, eggs, poultry and seafood, suggests Gans. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #6: Undiagnosed Food Allergy or Intolerance

Feeling sluggish? A growing number of health experts believe that fatigue may be a sign of an undiagnosed food allergy, such as the intolerance to wheat and gluten known as celiac disease. "Food intolerances can tax a woman's system because when the allergen is ingested, it can cause inflammation and a defensive reaction from her immune system," notes Dr. Peeke. "Allergies can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, from skin rashes, gastrointestinal bloating and pain to nausea and fatigue."

What to do? "If there is any concern about food allergies, a woman should consult her physician and work with her medical team to uncover the specific allergen," she explains. "The testing is fairly precise and will require her to modify her dietary intake during the evaluation. Treatment entails avoidance of any food that triggers a reaction." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #7: Too Much Caffeine

You drink coffee to rev up your energy, not drag you down. But too much java can have the opposite effect, say experts. "A normal amount of coffee includes 200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine, or roughly 2 to 4 cups of brewed coffee per day," says Dr. Peeke. "Once you're consuming 500 to 600 mg per day (5 to 7 cups), you can run into trouble." Some overcaffeinated symptoms include insomnia, irritability, headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

What to do? Consider switching to tea, which contains less caffeine yet can still give you a boost in the morning or afternoon. And get moving, says Dr. Peeke. "Doing physical activity, especially if it's intense, can rev up a woman's norepinephrine (adrenaline) and energize her." Also, when you need a boost, try having a glass of cold water&mdashnature's gentle way of energizing your body! Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #8: Little to Look Forward To

Everyone deals with peaks and valleys in their lives, but if your life consists of more valleys than peaks right now, it could affect your motivation, happiness and even energy. "You might be tired and dispirited because you don't have anything to look forward to," says Caroline Miller, MAPP, a life coach and the author of Creating Your Best Life. "Happy people tend to have a 'savoring' personality, which means that they often are anticipating pleasurable events, and their calendars are studded with parties, mini-trips, and outings with people who make them smile."

What to do? If you don't have much happening on the horizon, consider doing some goal-setting. "The happiest among us always wake up to clear-cut, challenging goals, according to groundbreaking research published in 2008," says Miller. "It's important that the goals take us out of our comfort zone, because efforts to accomplish those goals are what we tend to value most at the end of the day, and that elevates our self-esteem." Photo: Shutterstock


8 Surprising Reasons You're Tired

The source of your sleepiness could be a tiny organ near your throat that you may have never even thought about: your thyroid. According to recent estimates, 10 million Americans&mdashand as many as 10 percent of women&mdashhave hypothyroidism, a condition that can lead to hair loss, weight gain and fatigue. "Fatigue arises from a lack of thyroid hormone in the body, resulting in a decline in overall metabolic rate," says Pam Peeke, MD, author of Body for Life for Women. "Metabolism is like the body's battery. If you lack the thyroid hormone, your battery is slowly drained, and lack of energy is one of the first symptoms noted."

What to do? If you're feeling fatigued, talk to your doctor about the possibility of a thyroid issue. "It is easily detected by a simple blood test that determines the level of thyroid hormone as well as its master hormone." Treatment, usually daily replacement hormones, is inexpensive and noninvasive. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #2: Undiagnosed Depression

The reason you're feeling a lack of energy may have more to do with your mood than your body. Depression is the number-one risk factor for sleepiness and fatigue, says John Sharpe, MD, a Harvard psychiatrist and author of the new book The Emotional Calendar. And sometimes, he adds, this is how a depressive episode presents&mdashwith sudden drops in energy levels and an interest in sleeping more.

What to do? If you're experiencing persistent tiredness and little zest for life, talk to your doctor. She may want to refer you to a mental healthcare provider who can prescribe medication that boosts your mood and your energy levels. Photo: Thinkstock

Reason #3: Undiagnosed Sleep Disorder

You go to bed at a reasonable hour in order to get your full 8 hours of sleep, so why do you wake up exhausted? The answer could be a sleep disorder like sleep apnea, say experts, which causes poor, disrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep apnea affects as many as 20 percent of people who snore, and about 4 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 60. "Symptoms that should alert a woman include excessive daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, waking up in the morning feeling exhausted, having trouble with memory and concentration, morning or night headaches, episodes where you stop breathing, tossing and turning throughout the night, and nighttime choking or gasping."

What to do? Talk to your doctor about being referred to a sleep specialist. "The diagnosis is made by an evaluation of sleep test results," says Dr. Peeke. "A specialized mask that delivers oxygen during sleep is the traditional mode of therapy. Since a large number of people who have sleep apnea are obese, weight reduction is highly encouraged to alleviate if not reverse the condition." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #4: An Untreated Urinary Tract Infection

While pain, burning and irritability are the most common signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), some people's symptoms aren't as obvious. In fact, some women only feel tiredness or fatigue when a UTI hits. "Sometimes a UTI will present in a subtle way," explains Dr. Peeke. "Feeling tired and drained is common. This occurs because the woman is harboring an infection in her bladder, which creates a state of inflammation. This sets into motion a host of immune defenses, one of which results in the secretion of interleukins, white cells that can cause a feeling of fatigue."

What to do? If you suspect a UTI, see your doctor. "The diagnosis is made by an examination of a urine sample, looking for bacteria and red blood cells," she says. "The classic treatment is use of an antibiotic, encouragement to drink plenty of water to wash the infection through the bladder, and possibly a urethral anesthetizing medication to decrease the discomfort and frequency associated with urination." Photo: Shutterstock

What you put in your mouth has a direct correlation to your energy level, say experts. Not only are sufficient calories and protein necessary for optimum energy, but nutrients, like iron, are also important. And if you're not getting enough, you may be feeling fatigue. "Food is the fuel for our bodies, and without it they cannot function properly," says Keri Gans, RD, a New York&ndashbased dietitian and author of The Small Change Diet, who notes that two of the most common causes of fatigue are not eating enough and not eating the right foods. "If you lack iron in your diet, your body won't produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enable them to carry oxygen to your cells," she explains. "Too little iron and you could develop anemia, which can leave you feeling weak and tired."

What to do? Make sure you're eating three balanced meals a day, and two healthy snacks. And, to make sure you're getting enough iron, eat plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, iron-fortified cereals, whole-grain breads and pasta, nuts and seeds, beans, eggs, poultry and seafood, suggests Gans. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #6: Undiagnosed Food Allergy or Intolerance

Feeling sluggish? A growing number of health experts believe that fatigue may be a sign of an undiagnosed food allergy, such as the intolerance to wheat and gluten known as celiac disease. "Food intolerances can tax a woman's system because when the allergen is ingested, it can cause inflammation and a defensive reaction from her immune system," notes Dr. Peeke. "Allergies can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, from skin rashes, gastrointestinal bloating and pain to nausea and fatigue."

What to do? "If there is any concern about food allergies, a woman should consult her physician and work with her medical team to uncover the specific allergen," she explains. "The testing is fairly precise and will require her to modify her dietary intake during the evaluation. Treatment entails avoidance of any food that triggers a reaction." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #7: Too Much Caffeine

You drink coffee to rev up your energy, not drag you down. But too much java can have the opposite effect, say experts. "A normal amount of coffee includes 200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine, or roughly 2 to 4 cups of brewed coffee per day," says Dr. Peeke. "Once you're consuming 500 to 600 mg per day (5 to 7 cups), you can run into trouble." Some overcaffeinated symptoms include insomnia, irritability, headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

What to do? Consider switching to tea, which contains less caffeine yet can still give you a boost in the morning or afternoon. And get moving, says Dr. Peeke. "Doing physical activity, especially if it's intense, can rev up a woman's norepinephrine (adrenaline) and energize her." Also, when you need a boost, try having a glass of cold water&mdashnature's gentle way of energizing your body! Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #8: Little to Look Forward To

Everyone deals with peaks and valleys in their lives, but if your life consists of more valleys than peaks right now, it could affect your motivation, happiness and even energy. "You might be tired and dispirited because you don't have anything to look forward to," says Caroline Miller, MAPP, a life coach and the author of Creating Your Best Life. "Happy people tend to have a 'savoring' personality, which means that they often are anticipating pleasurable events, and their calendars are studded with parties, mini-trips, and outings with people who make them smile."

What to do? If you don't have much happening on the horizon, consider doing some goal-setting. "The happiest among us always wake up to clear-cut, challenging goals, according to groundbreaking research published in 2008," says Miller. "It's important that the goals take us out of our comfort zone, because efforts to accomplish those goals are what we tend to value most at the end of the day, and that elevates our self-esteem." Photo: Shutterstock


8 Surprising Reasons You're Tired

The source of your sleepiness could be a tiny organ near your throat that you may have never even thought about: your thyroid. According to recent estimates, 10 million Americans&mdashand as many as 10 percent of women&mdashhave hypothyroidism, a condition that can lead to hair loss, weight gain and fatigue. "Fatigue arises from a lack of thyroid hormone in the body, resulting in a decline in overall metabolic rate," says Pam Peeke, MD, author of Body for Life for Women. "Metabolism is like the body's battery. If you lack the thyroid hormone, your battery is slowly drained, and lack of energy is one of the first symptoms noted."

What to do? If you're feeling fatigued, talk to your doctor about the possibility of a thyroid issue. "It is easily detected by a simple blood test that determines the level of thyroid hormone as well as its master hormone." Treatment, usually daily replacement hormones, is inexpensive and noninvasive. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #2: Undiagnosed Depression

The reason you're feeling a lack of energy may have more to do with your mood than your body. Depression is the number-one risk factor for sleepiness and fatigue, says John Sharpe, MD, a Harvard psychiatrist and author of the new book The Emotional Calendar. And sometimes, he adds, this is how a depressive episode presents&mdashwith sudden drops in energy levels and an interest in sleeping more.

What to do? If you're experiencing persistent tiredness and little zest for life, talk to your doctor. She may want to refer you to a mental healthcare provider who can prescribe medication that boosts your mood and your energy levels. Photo: Thinkstock

Reason #3: Undiagnosed Sleep Disorder

You go to bed at a reasonable hour in order to get your full 8 hours of sleep, so why do you wake up exhausted? The answer could be a sleep disorder like sleep apnea, say experts, which causes poor, disrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep apnea affects as many as 20 percent of people who snore, and about 4 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 60. "Symptoms that should alert a woman include excessive daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, waking up in the morning feeling exhausted, having trouble with memory and concentration, morning or night headaches, episodes where you stop breathing, tossing and turning throughout the night, and nighttime choking or gasping."

What to do? Talk to your doctor about being referred to a sleep specialist. "The diagnosis is made by an evaluation of sleep test results," says Dr. Peeke. "A specialized mask that delivers oxygen during sleep is the traditional mode of therapy. Since a large number of people who have sleep apnea are obese, weight reduction is highly encouraged to alleviate if not reverse the condition." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #4: An Untreated Urinary Tract Infection

While pain, burning and irritability are the most common signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), some people's symptoms aren't as obvious. In fact, some women only feel tiredness or fatigue when a UTI hits. "Sometimes a UTI will present in a subtle way," explains Dr. Peeke. "Feeling tired and drained is common. This occurs because the woman is harboring an infection in her bladder, which creates a state of inflammation. This sets into motion a host of immune defenses, one of which results in the secretion of interleukins, white cells that can cause a feeling of fatigue."

What to do? If you suspect a UTI, see your doctor. "The diagnosis is made by an examination of a urine sample, looking for bacteria and red blood cells," she says. "The classic treatment is use of an antibiotic, encouragement to drink plenty of water to wash the infection through the bladder, and possibly a urethral anesthetizing medication to decrease the discomfort and frequency associated with urination." Photo: Shutterstock

What you put in your mouth has a direct correlation to your energy level, say experts. Not only are sufficient calories and protein necessary for optimum energy, but nutrients, like iron, are also important. And if you're not getting enough, you may be feeling fatigue. "Food is the fuel for our bodies, and without it they cannot function properly," says Keri Gans, RD, a New York&ndashbased dietitian and author of The Small Change Diet, who notes that two of the most common causes of fatigue are not eating enough and not eating the right foods. "If you lack iron in your diet, your body won't produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enable them to carry oxygen to your cells," she explains. "Too little iron and you could develop anemia, which can leave you feeling weak and tired."

What to do? Make sure you're eating three balanced meals a day, and two healthy snacks. And, to make sure you're getting enough iron, eat plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, iron-fortified cereals, whole-grain breads and pasta, nuts and seeds, beans, eggs, poultry and seafood, suggests Gans. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #6: Undiagnosed Food Allergy or Intolerance

Feeling sluggish? A growing number of health experts believe that fatigue may be a sign of an undiagnosed food allergy, such as the intolerance to wheat and gluten known as celiac disease. "Food intolerances can tax a woman's system because when the allergen is ingested, it can cause inflammation and a defensive reaction from her immune system," notes Dr. Peeke. "Allergies can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, from skin rashes, gastrointestinal bloating and pain to nausea and fatigue."

What to do? "If there is any concern about food allergies, a woman should consult her physician and work with her medical team to uncover the specific allergen," she explains. "The testing is fairly precise and will require her to modify her dietary intake during the evaluation. Treatment entails avoidance of any food that triggers a reaction." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #7: Too Much Caffeine

You drink coffee to rev up your energy, not drag you down. But too much java can have the opposite effect, say experts. "A normal amount of coffee includes 200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine, or roughly 2 to 4 cups of brewed coffee per day," says Dr. Peeke. "Once you're consuming 500 to 600 mg per day (5 to 7 cups), you can run into trouble." Some overcaffeinated symptoms include insomnia, irritability, headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

What to do? Consider switching to tea, which contains less caffeine yet can still give you a boost in the morning or afternoon. And get moving, says Dr. Peeke. "Doing physical activity, especially if it's intense, can rev up a woman's norepinephrine (adrenaline) and energize her." Also, when you need a boost, try having a glass of cold water&mdashnature's gentle way of energizing your body! Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #8: Little to Look Forward To

Everyone deals with peaks and valleys in their lives, but if your life consists of more valleys than peaks right now, it could affect your motivation, happiness and even energy. "You might be tired and dispirited because you don't have anything to look forward to," says Caroline Miller, MAPP, a life coach and the author of Creating Your Best Life. "Happy people tend to have a 'savoring' personality, which means that they often are anticipating pleasurable events, and their calendars are studded with parties, mini-trips, and outings with people who make them smile."

What to do? If you don't have much happening on the horizon, consider doing some goal-setting. "The happiest among us always wake up to clear-cut, challenging goals, according to groundbreaking research published in 2008," says Miller. "It's important that the goals take us out of our comfort zone, because efforts to accomplish those goals are what we tend to value most at the end of the day, and that elevates our self-esteem." Photo: Shutterstock


8 Surprising Reasons You're Tired

The source of your sleepiness could be a tiny organ near your throat that you may have never even thought about: your thyroid. According to recent estimates, 10 million Americans&mdashand as many as 10 percent of women&mdashhave hypothyroidism, a condition that can lead to hair loss, weight gain and fatigue. "Fatigue arises from a lack of thyroid hormone in the body, resulting in a decline in overall metabolic rate," says Pam Peeke, MD, author of Body for Life for Women. "Metabolism is like the body's battery. If you lack the thyroid hormone, your battery is slowly drained, and lack of energy is one of the first symptoms noted."

What to do? If you're feeling fatigued, talk to your doctor about the possibility of a thyroid issue. "It is easily detected by a simple blood test that determines the level of thyroid hormone as well as its master hormone." Treatment, usually daily replacement hormones, is inexpensive and noninvasive. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #2: Undiagnosed Depression

The reason you're feeling a lack of energy may have more to do with your mood than your body. Depression is the number-one risk factor for sleepiness and fatigue, says John Sharpe, MD, a Harvard psychiatrist and author of the new book The Emotional Calendar. And sometimes, he adds, this is how a depressive episode presents&mdashwith sudden drops in energy levels and an interest in sleeping more.

What to do? If you're experiencing persistent tiredness and little zest for life, talk to your doctor. She may want to refer you to a mental healthcare provider who can prescribe medication that boosts your mood and your energy levels. Photo: Thinkstock

Reason #3: Undiagnosed Sleep Disorder

You go to bed at a reasonable hour in order to get your full 8 hours of sleep, so why do you wake up exhausted? The answer could be a sleep disorder like sleep apnea, say experts, which causes poor, disrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep apnea affects as many as 20 percent of people who snore, and about 4 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 60. "Symptoms that should alert a woman include excessive daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, waking up in the morning feeling exhausted, having trouble with memory and concentration, morning or night headaches, episodes where you stop breathing, tossing and turning throughout the night, and nighttime choking or gasping."

What to do? Talk to your doctor about being referred to a sleep specialist. "The diagnosis is made by an evaluation of sleep test results," says Dr. Peeke. "A specialized mask that delivers oxygen during sleep is the traditional mode of therapy. Since a large number of people who have sleep apnea are obese, weight reduction is highly encouraged to alleviate if not reverse the condition." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #4: An Untreated Urinary Tract Infection

While pain, burning and irritability are the most common signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), some people's symptoms aren't as obvious. In fact, some women only feel tiredness or fatigue when a UTI hits. "Sometimes a UTI will present in a subtle way," explains Dr. Peeke. "Feeling tired and drained is common. This occurs because the woman is harboring an infection in her bladder, which creates a state of inflammation. This sets into motion a host of immune defenses, one of which results in the secretion of interleukins, white cells that can cause a feeling of fatigue."

What to do? If you suspect a UTI, see your doctor. "The diagnosis is made by an examination of a urine sample, looking for bacteria and red blood cells," she says. "The classic treatment is use of an antibiotic, encouragement to drink plenty of water to wash the infection through the bladder, and possibly a urethral anesthetizing medication to decrease the discomfort and frequency associated with urination." Photo: Shutterstock

What you put in your mouth has a direct correlation to your energy level, say experts. Not only are sufficient calories and protein necessary for optimum energy, but nutrients, like iron, are also important. And if you're not getting enough, you may be feeling fatigue. "Food is the fuel for our bodies, and without it they cannot function properly," says Keri Gans, RD, a New York&ndashbased dietitian and author of The Small Change Diet, who notes that two of the most common causes of fatigue are not eating enough and not eating the right foods. "If you lack iron in your diet, your body won't produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enable them to carry oxygen to your cells," she explains. "Too little iron and you could develop anemia, which can leave you feeling weak and tired."

What to do? Make sure you're eating three balanced meals a day, and two healthy snacks. And, to make sure you're getting enough iron, eat plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, iron-fortified cereals, whole-grain breads and pasta, nuts and seeds, beans, eggs, poultry and seafood, suggests Gans. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #6: Undiagnosed Food Allergy or Intolerance

Feeling sluggish? A growing number of health experts believe that fatigue may be a sign of an undiagnosed food allergy, such as the intolerance to wheat and gluten known as celiac disease. "Food intolerances can tax a woman's system because when the allergen is ingested, it can cause inflammation and a defensive reaction from her immune system," notes Dr. Peeke. "Allergies can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, from skin rashes, gastrointestinal bloating and pain to nausea and fatigue."

What to do? "If there is any concern about food allergies, a woman should consult her physician and work with her medical team to uncover the specific allergen," she explains. "The testing is fairly precise and will require her to modify her dietary intake during the evaluation. Treatment entails avoidance of any food that triggers a reaction." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #7: Too Much Caffeine

You drink coffee to rev up your energy, not drag you down. But too much java can have the opposite effect, say experts. "A normal amount of coffee includes 200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine, or roughly 2 to 4 cups of brewed coffee per day," says Dr. Peeke. "Once you're consuming 500 to 600 mg per day (5 to 7 cups), you can run into trouble." Some overcaffeinated symptoms include insomnia, irritability, headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

What to do? Consider switching to tea, which contains less caffeine yet can still give you a boost in the morning or afternoon. And get moving, says Dr. Peeke. "Doing physical activity, especially if it's intense, can rev up a woman's norepinephrine (adrenaline) and energize her." Also, when you need a boost, try having a glass of cold water&mdashnature's gentle way of energizing your body! Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #8: Little to Look Forward To

Everyone deals with peaks and valleys in their lives, but if your life consists of more valleys than peaks right now, it could affect your motivation, happiness and even energy. "You might be tired and dispirited because you don't have anything to look forward to," says Caroline Miller, MAPP, a life coach and the author of Creating Your Best Life. "Happy people tend to have a 'savoring' personality, which means that they often are anticipating pleasurable events, and their calendars are studded with parties, mini-trips, and outings with people who make them smile."

What to do? If you don't have much happening on the horizon, consider doing some goal-setting. "The happiest among us always wake up to clear-cut, challenging goals, according to groundbreaking research published in 2008," says Miller. "It's important that the goals take us out of our comfort zone, because efforts to accomplish those goals are what we tend to value most at the end of the day, and that elevates our self-esteem." Photo: Shutterstock


8 Surprising Reasons You're Tired

The source of your sleepiness could be a tiny organ near your throat that you may have never even thought about: your thyroid. According to recent estimates, 10 million Americans&mdashand as many as 10 percent of women&mdashhave hypothyroidism, a condition that can lead to hair loss, weight gain and fatigue. "Fatigue arises from a lack of thyroid hormone in the body, resulting in a decline in overall metabolic rate," says Pam Peeke, MD, author of Body for Life for Women. "Metabolism is like the body's battery. If you lack the thyroid hormone, your battery is slowly drained, and lack of energy is one of the first symptoms noted."

What to do? If you're feeling fatigued, talk to your doctor about the possibility of a thyroid issue. "It is easily detected by a simple blood test that determines the level of thyroid hormone as well as its master hormone." Treatment, usually daily replacement hormones, is inexpensive and noninvasive. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #2: Undiagnosed Depression

The reason you're feeling a lack of energy may have more to do with your mood than your body. Depression is the number-one risk factor for sleepiness and fatigue, says John Sharpe, MD, a Harvard psychiatrist and author of the new book The Emotional Calendar. And sometimes, he adds, this is how a depressive episode presents&mdashwith sudden drops in energy levels and an interest in sleeping more.

What to do? If you're experiencing persistent tiredness and little zest for life, talk to your doctor. She may want to refer you to a mental healthcare provider who can prescribe medication that boosts your mood and your energy levels. Photo: Thinkstock

Reason #3: Undiagnosed Sleep Disorder

You go to bed at a reasonable hour in order to get your full 8 hours of sleep, so why do you wake up exhausted? The answer could be a sleep disorder like sleep apnea, say experts, which causes poor, disrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep apnea affects as many as 20 percent of people who snore, and about 4 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 60. "Symptoms that should alert a woman include excessive daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, waking up in the morning feeling exhausted, having trouble with memory and concentration, morning or night headaches, episodes where you stop breathing, tossing and turning throughout the night, and nighttime choking or gasping."

What to do? Talk to your doctor about being referred to a sleep specialist. "The diagnosis is made by an evaluation of sleep test results," says Dr. Peeke. "A specialized mask that delivers oxygen during sleep is the traditional mode of therapy. Since a large number of people who have sleep apnea are obese, weight reduction is highly encouraged to alleviate if not reverse the condition." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #4: An Untreated Urinary Tract Infection

While pain, burning and irritability are the most common signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), some people's symptoms aren't as obvious. In fact, some women only feel tiredness or fatigue when a UTI hits. "Sometimes a UTI will present in a subtle way," explains Dr. Peeke. "Feeling tired and drained is common. This occurs because the woman is harboring an infection in her bladder, which creates a state of inflammation. This sets into motion a host of immune defenses, one of which results in the secretion of interleukins, white cells that can cause a feeling of fatigue."

What to do? If you suspect a UTI, see your doctor. "The diagnosis is made by an examination of a urine sample, looking for bacteria and red blood cells," she says. "The classic treatment is use of an antibiotic, encouragement to drink plenty of water to wash the infection through the bladder, and possibly a urethral anesthetizing medication to decrease the discomfort and frequency associated with urination." Photo: Shutterstock

What you put in your mouth has a direct correlation to your energy level, say experts. Not only are sufficient calories and protein necessary for optimum energy, but nutrients, like iron, are also important. And if you're not getting enough, you may be feeling fatigue. "Food is the fuel for our bodies, and without it they cannot function properly," says Keri Gans, RD, a New York&ndashbased dietitian and author of The Small Change Diet, who notes that two of the most common causes of fatigue are not eating enough and not eating the right foods. "If you lack iron in your diet, your body won't produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enable them to carry oxygen to your cells," she explains. "Too little iron and you could develop anemia, which can leave you feeling weak and tired."

What to do? Make sure you're eating three balanced meals a day, and two healthy snacks. And, to make sure you're getting enough iron, eat plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, iron-fortified cereals, whole-grain breads and pasta, nuts and seeds, beans, eggs, poultry and seafood, suggests Gans. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #6: Undiagnosed Food Allergy or Intolerance

Feeling sluggish? A growing number of health experts believe that fatigue may be a sign of an undiagnosed food allergy, such as the intolerance to wheat and gluten known as celiac disease. "Food intolerances can tax a woman's system because when the allergen is ingested, it can cause inflammation and a defensive reaction from her immune system," notes Dr. Peeke. "Allergies can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, from skin rashes, gastrointestinal bloating and pain to nausea and fatigue."

What to do? "If there is any concern about food allergies, a woman should consult her physician and work with her medical team to uncover the specific allergen," she explains. "The testing is fairly precise and will require her to modify her dietary intake during the evaluation. Treatment entails avoidance of any food that triggers a reaction." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #7: Too Much Caffeine

You drink coffee to rev up your energy, not drag you down. But too much java can have the opposite effect, say experts. "A normal amount of coffee includes 200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine, or roughly 2 to 4 cups of brewed coffee per day," says Dr. Peeke. "Once you're consuming 500 to 600 mg per day (5 to 7 cups), you can run into trouble." Some overcaffeinated symptoms include insomnia, irritability, headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

What to do? Consider switching to tea, which contains less caffeine yet can still give you a boost in the morning or afternoon. And get moving, says Dr. Peeke. "Doing physical activity, especially if it's intense, can rev up a woman's norepinephrine (adrenaline) and energize her." Also, when you need a boost, try having a glass of cold water&mdashnature's gentle way of energizing your body! Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #8: Little to Look Forward To

Everyone deals with peaks and valleys in their lives, but if your life consists of more valleys than peaks right now, it could affect your motivation, happiness and even energy. "You might be tired and dispirited because you don't have anything to look forward to," says Caroline Miller, MAPP, a life coach and the author of Creating Your Best Life. "Happy people tend to have a 'savoring' personality, which means that they often are anticipating pleasurable events, and their calendars are studded with parties, mini-trips, and outings with people who make them smile."

What to do? If you don't have much happening on the horizon, consider doing some goal-setting. "The happiest among us always wake up to clear-cut, challenging goals, according to groundbreaking research published in 2008," says Miller. "It's important that the goals take us out of our comfort zone, because efforts to accomplish those goals are what we tend to value most at the end of the day, and that elevates our self-esteem." Photo: Shutterstock


8 Surprising Reasons You're Tired

The source of your sleepiness could be a tiny organ near your throat that you may have never even thought about: your thyroid. According to recent estimates, 10 million Americans&mdashand as many as 10 percent of women&mdashhave hypothyroidism, a condition that can lead to hair loss, weight gain and fatigue. "Fatigue arises from a lack of thyroid hormone in the body, resulting in a decline in overall metabolic rate," says Pam Peeke, MD, author of Body for Life for Women. "Metabolism is like the body's battery. If you lack the thyroid hormone, your battery is slowly drained, and lack of energy is one of the first symptoms noted."

What to do? If you're feeling fatigued, talk to your doctor about the possibility of a thyroid issue. "It is easily detected by a simple blood test that determines the level of thyroid hormone as well as its master hormone." Treatment, usually daily replacement hormones, is inexpensive and noninvasive. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #2: Undiagnosed Depression

The reason you're feeling a lack of energy may have more to do with your mood than your body. Depression is the number-one risk factor for sleepiness and fatigue, says John Sharpe, MD, a Harvard psychiatrist and author of the new book The Emotional Calendar. And sometimes, he adds, this is how a depressive episode presents&mdashwith sudden drops in energy levels and an interest in sleeping more.

What to do? If you're experiencing persistent tiredness and little zest for life, talk to your doctor. She may want to refer you to a mental healthcare provider who can prescribe medication that boosts your mood and your energy levels. Photo: Thinkstock

Reason #3: Undiagnosed Sleep Disorder

You go to bed at a reasonable hour in order to get your full 8 hours of sleep, so why do you wake up exhausted? The answer could be a sleep disorder like sleep apnea, say experts, which causes poor, disrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep apnea affects as many as 20 percent of people who snore, and about 4 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 60. "Symptoms that should alert a woman include excessive daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, waking up in the morning feeling exhausted, having trouble with memory and concentration, morning or night headaches, episodes where you stop breathing, tossing and turning throughout the night, and nighttime choking or gasping."

What to do? Talk to your doctor about being referred to a sleep specialist. "The diagnosis is made by an evaluation of sleep test results," says Dr. Peeke. "A specialized mask that delivers oxygen during sleep is the traditional mode of therapy. Since a large number of people who have sleep apnea are obese, weight reduction is highly encouraged to alleviate if not reverse the condition." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #4: An Untreated Urinary Tract Infection

While pain, burning and irritability are the most common signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), some people's symptoms aren't as obvious. In fact, some women only feel tiredness or fatigue when a UTI hits. "Sometimes a UTI will present in a subtle way," explains Dr. Peeke. "Feeling tired and drained is common. This occurs because the woman is harboring an infection in her bladder, which creates a state of inflammation. This sets into motion a host of immune defenses, one of which results in the secretion of interleukins, white cells that can cause a feeling of fatigue."

What to do? If you suspect a UTI, see your doctor. "The diagnosis is made by an examination of a urine sample, looking for bacteria and red blood cells," she says. "The classic treatment is use of an antibiotic, encouragement to drink plenty of water to wash the infection through the bladder, and possibly a urethral anesthetizing medication to decrease the discomfort and frequency associated with urination." Photo: Shutterstock

What you put in your mouth has a direct correlation to your energy level, say experts. Not only are sufficient calories and protein necessary for optimum energy, but nutrients, like iron, are also important. And if you're not getting enough, you may be feeling fatigue. "Food is the fuel for our bodies, and without it they cannot function properly," says Keri Gans, RD, a New York&ndashbased dietitian and author of The Small Change Diet, who notes that two of the most common causes of fatigue are not eating enough and not eating the right foods. "If you lack iron in your diet, your body won't produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enable them to carry oxygen to your cells," she explains. "Too little iron and you could develop anemia, which can leave you feeling weak and tired."

What to do? Make sure you're eating three balanced meals a day, and two healthy snacks. And, to make sure you're getting enough iron, eat plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, iron-fortified cereals, whole-grain breads and pasta, nuts and seeds, beans, eggs, poultry and seafood, suggests Gans. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #6: Undiagnosed Food Allergy or Intolerance

Feeling sluggish? A growing number of health experts believe that fatigue may be a sign of an undiagnosed food allergy, such as the intolerance to wheat and gluten known as celiac disease. "Food intolerances can tax a woman's system because when the allergen is ingested, it can cause inflammation and a defensive reaction from her immune system," notes Dr. Peeke. "Allergies can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, from skin rashes, gastrointestinal bloating and pain to nausea and fatigue."

What to do? "If there is any concern about food allergies, a woman should consult her physician and work with her medical team to uncover the specific allergen," she explains. "The testing is fairly precise and will require her to modify her dietary intake during the evaluation. Treatment entails avoidance of any food that triggers a reaction." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #7: Too Much Caffeine

You drink coffee to rev up your energy, not drag you down. But too much java can have the opposite effect, say experts. "A normal amount of coffee includes 200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine, or roughly 2 to 4 cups of brewed coffee per day," says Dr. Peeke. "Once you're consuming 500 to 600 mg per day (5 to 7 cups), you can run into trouble." Some overcaffeinated symptoms include insomnia, irritability, headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

What to do? Consider switching to tea, which contains less caffeine yet can still give you a boost in the morning or afternoon. And get moving, says Dr. Peeke. "Doing physical activity, especially if it's intense, can rev up a woman's norepinephrine (adrenaline) and energize her." Also, when you need a boost, try having a glass of cold water&mdashnature's gentle way of energizing your body! Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #8: Little to Look Forward To

Everyone deals with peaks and valleys in their lives, but if your life consists of more valleys than peaks right now, it could affect your motivation, happiness and even energy. "You might be tired and dispirited because you don't have anything to look forward to," says Caroline Miller, MAPP, a life coach and the author of Creating Your Best Life. "Happy people tend to have a 'savoring' personality, which means that they often are anticipating pleasurable events, and their calendars are studded with parties, mini-trips, and outings with people who make them smile."

What to do? If you don't have much happening on the horizon, consider doing some goal-setting. "The happiest among us always wake up to clear-cut, challenging goals, according to groundbreaking research published in 2008," says Miller. "It's important that the goals take us out of our comfort zone, because efforts to accomplish those goals are what we tend to value most at the end of the day, and that elevates our self-esteem." Photo: Shutterstock


8 Surprising Reasons You're Tired

The source of your sleepiness could be a tiny organ near your throat that you may have never even thought about: your thyroid. According to recent estimates, 10 million Americans&mdashand as many as 10 percent of women&mdashhave hypothyroidism, a condition that can lead to hair loss, weight gain and fatigue. "Fatigue arises from a lack of thyroid hormone in the body, resulting in a decline in overall metabolic rate," says Pam Peeke, MD, author of Body for Life for Women. "Metabolism is like the body's battery. If you lack the thyroid hormone, your battery is slowly drained, and lack of energy is one of the first symptoms noted."

What to do? If you're feeling fatigued, talk to your doctor about the possibility of a thyroid issue. "It is easily detected by a simple blood test that determines the level of thyroid hormone as well as its master hormone." Treatment, usually daily replacement hormones, is inexpensive and noninvasive. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #2: Undiagnosed Depression

The reason you're feeling a lack of energy may have more to do with your mood than your body. Depression is the number-one risk factor for sleepiness and fatigue, says John Sharpe, MD, a Harvard psychiatrist and author of the new book The Emotional Calendar. And sometimes, he adds, this is how a depressive episode presents&mdashwith sudden drops in energy levels and an interest in sleeping more.

What to do? If you're experiencing persistent tiredness and little zest for life, talk to your doctor. She may want to refer you to a mental healthcare provider who can prescribe medication that boosts your mood and your energy levels. Photo: Thinkstock

Reason #3: Undiagnosed Sleep Disorder

You go to bed at a reasonable hour in order to get your full 8 hours of sleep, so why do you wake up exhausted? The answer could be a sleep disorder like sleep apnea, say experts, which causes poor, disrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep apnea affects as many as 20 percent of people who snore, and about 4 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 60. "Symptoms that should alert a woman include excessive daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, waking up in the morning feeling exhausted, having trouble with memory and concentration, morning or night headaches, episodes where you stop breathing, tossing and turning throughout the night, and nighttime choking or gasping."

What to do? Talk to your doctor about being referred to a sleep specialist. "The diagnosis is made by an evaluation of sleep test results," says Dr. Peeke. "A specialized mask that delivers oxygen during sleep is the traditional mode of therapy. Since a large number of people who have sleep apnea are obese, weight reduction is highly encouraged to alleviate if not reverse the condition." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #4: An Untreated Urinary Tract Infection

While pain, burning and irritability are the most common signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), some people's symptoms aren't as obvious. In fact, some women only feel tiredness or fatigue when a UTI hits. "Sometimes a UTI will present in a subtle way," explains Dr. Peeke. "Feeling tired and drained is common. This occurs because the woman is harboring an infection in her bladder, which creates a state of inflammation. This sets into motion a host of immune defenses, one of which results in the secretion of interleukins, white cells that can cause a feeling of fatigue."

What to do? If you suspect a UTI, see your doctor. "The diagnosis is made by an examination of a urine sample, looking for bacteria and red blood cells," she says. "The classic treatment is use of an antibiotic, encouragement to drink plenty of water to wash the infection through the bladder, and possibly a urethral anesthetizing medication to decrease the discomfort and frequency associated with urination." Photo: Shutterstock

What you put in your mouth has a direct correlation to your energy level, say experts. Not only are sufficient calories and protein necessary for optimum energy, but nutrients, like iron, are also important. And if you're not getting enough, you may be feeling fatigue. "Food is the fuel for our bodies, and without it they cannot function properly," says Keri Gans, RD, a New York&ndashbased dietitian and author of The Small Change Diet, who notes that two of the most common causes of fatigue are not eating enough and not eating the right foods. "If you lack iron in your diet, your body won't produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enable them to carry oxygen to your cells," she explains. "Too little iron and you could develop anemia, which can leave you feeling weak and tired."

What to do? Make sure you're eating three balanced meals a day, and two healthy snacks. And, to make sure you're getting enough iron, eat plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, iron-fortified cereals, whole-grain breads and pasta, nuts and seeds, beans, eggs, poultry and seafood, suggests Gans. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #6: Undiagnosed Food Allergy or Intolerance

Feeling sluggish? A growing number of health experts believe that fatigue may be a sign of an undiagnosed food allergy, such as the intolerance to wheat and gluten known as celiac disease. "Food intolerances can tax a woman's system because when the allergen is ingested, it can cause inflammation and a defensive reaction from her immune system," notes Dr. Peeke. "Allergies can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, from skin rashes, gastrointestinal bloating and pain to nausea and fatigue."

What to do? "If there is any concern about food allergies, a woman should consult her physician and work with her medical team to uncover the specific allergen," she explains. "The testing is fairly precise and will require her to modify her dietary intake during the evaluation. Treatment entails avoidance of any food that triggers a reaction." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #7: Too Much Caffeine

You drink coffee to rev up your energy, not drag you down. But too much java can have the opposite effect, say experts. "A normal amount of coffee includes 200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine, or roughly 2 to 4 cups of brewed coffee per day," says Dr. Peeke. "Once you're consuming 500 to 600 mg per day (5 to 7 cups), you can run into trouble." Some overcaffeinated symptoms include insomnia, irritability, headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

What to do? Consider switching to tea, which contains less caffeine yet can still give you a boost in the morning or afternoon. And get moving, says Dr. Peeke. "Doing physical activity, especially if it's intense, can rev up a woman's norepinephrine (adrenaline) and energize her." Also, when you need a boost, try having a glass of cold water&mdashnature's gentle way of energizing your body! Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #8: Little to Look Forward To

Everyone deals with peaks and valleys in their lives, but if your life consists of more valleys than peaks right now, it could affect your motivation, happiness and even energy. "You might be tired and dispirited because you don't have anything to look forward to," says Caroline Miller, MAPP, a life coach and the author of Creating Your Best Life. "Happy people tend to have a 'savoring' personality, which means that they often are anticipating pleasurable events, and their calendars are studded with parties, mini-trips, and outings with people who make them smile."

What to do? If you don't have much happening on the horizon, consider doing some goal-setting. "The happiest among us always wake up to clear-cut, challenging goals, according to groundbreaking research published in 2008," says Miller. "It's important that the goals take us out of our comfort zone, because efforts to accomplish those goals are what we tend to value most at the end of the day, and that elevates our self-esteem." Photo: Shutterstock


8 Surprising Reasons You're Tired

The source of your sleepiness could be a tiny organ near your throat that you may have never even thought about: your thyroid. According to recent estimates, 10 million Americans&mdashand as many as 10 percent of women&mdashhave hypothyroidism, a condition that can lead to hair loss, weight gain and fatigue. "Fatigue arises from a lack of thyroid hormone in the body, resulting in a decline in overall metabolic rate," says Pam Peeke, MD, author of Body for Life for Women. "Metabolism is like the body's battery. If you lack the thyroid hormone, your battery is slowly drained, and lack of energy is one of the first symptoms noted."

What to do? If you're feeling fatigued, talk to your doctor about the possibility of a thyroid issue. "It is easily detected by a simple blood test that determines the level of thyroid hormone as well as its master hormone." Treatment, usually daily replacement hormones, is inexpensive and noninvasive. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #2: Undiagnosed Depression

The reason you're feeling a lack of energy may have more to do with your mood than your body. Depression is the number-one risk factor for sleepiness and fatigue, says John Sharpe, MD, a Harvard psychiatrist and author of the new book The Emotional Calendar. And sometimes, he adds, this is how a depressive episode presents&mdashwith sudden drops in energy levels and an interest in sleeping more.

What to do? If you're experiencing persistent tiredness and little zest for life, talk to your doctor. She may want to refer you to a mental healthcare provider who can prescribe medication that boosts your mood and your energy levels. Photo: Thinkstock

Reason #3: Undiagnosed Sleep Disorder

You go to bed at a reasonable hour in order to get your full 8 hours of sleep, so why do you wake up exhausted? The answer could be a sleep disorder like sleep apnea, say experts, which causes poor, disrupted sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep apnea affects as many as 20 percent of people who snore, and about 4 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 60. "Symptoms that should alert a woman include excessive daytime sleepiness, loud snoring, waking up in the morning feeling exhausted, having trouble with memory and concentration, morning or night headaches, episodes where you stop breathing, tossing and turning throughout the night, and nighttime choking or gasping."

What to do? Talk to your doctor about being referred to a sleep specialist. "The diagnosis is made by an evaluation of sleep test results," says Dr. Peeke. "A specialized mask that delivers oxygen during sleep is the traditional mode of therapy. Since a large number of people who have sleep apnea are obese, weight reduction is highly encouraged to alleviate if not reverse the condition." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #4: An Untreated Urinary Tract Infection

While pain, burning and irritability are the most common signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), some people's symptoms aren't as obvious. In fact, some women only feel tiredness or fatigue when a UTI hits. "Sometimes a UTI will present in a subtle way," explains Dr. Peeke. "Feeling tired and drained is common. This occurs because the woman is harboring an infection in her bladder, which creates a state of inflammation. This sets into motion a host of immune defenses, one of which results in the secretion of interleukins, white cells that can cause a feeling of fatigue."

What to do? If you suspect a UTI, see your doctor. "The diagnosis is made by an examination of a urine sample, looking for bacteria and red blood cells," she says. "The classic treatment is use of an antibiotic, encouragement to drink plenty of water to wash the infection through the bladder, and possibly a urethral anesthetizing medication to decrease the discomfort and frequency associated with urination." Photo: Shutterstock

What you put in your mouth has a direct correlation to your energy level, say experts. Not only are sufficient calories and protein necessary for optimum energy, but nutrients, like iron, are also important. And if you're not getting enough, you may be feeling fatigue. "Food is the fuel for our bodies, and without it they cannot function properly," says Keri Gans, RD, a New York&ndashbased dietitian and author of The Small Change Diet, who notes that two of the most common causes of fatigue are not eating enough and not eating the right foods. "If you lack iron in your diet, your body won't produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that enable them to carry oxygen to your cells," she explains. "Too little iron and you could develop anemia, which can leave you feeling weak and tired."

What to do? Make sure you're eating three balanced meals a day, and two healthy snacks. And, to make sure you're getting enough iron, eat plenty of dark green leafy vegetables, iron-fortified cereals, whole-grain breads and pasta, nuts and seeds, beans, eggs, poultry and seafood, suggests Gans. Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #6: Undiagnosed Food Allergy or Intolerance

Feeling sluggish? A growing number of health experts believe that fatigue may be a sign of an undiagnosed food allergy, such as the intolerance to wheat and gluten known as celiac disease. "Food intolerances can tax a woman's system because when the allergen is ingested, it can cause inflammation and a defensive reaction from her immune system," notes Dr. Peeke. "Allergies can manifest themselves in a variety of ways, from skin rashes, gastrointestinal bloating and pain to nausea and fatigue."

What to do? "If there is any concern about food allergies, a woman should consult her physician and work with her medical team to uncover the specific allergen," she explains. "The testing is fairly precise and will require her to modify her dietary intake during the evaluation. Treatment entails avoidance of any food that triggers a reaction." Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #7: Too Much Caffeine

You drink coffee to rev up your energy, not drag you down. But too much java can have the opposite effect, say experts. "A normal amount of coffee includes 200 to 300 milligrams of caffeine, or roughly 2 to 4 cups of brewed coffee per day," says Dr. Peeke. "Once you're consuming 500 to 600 mg per day (5 to 7 cups), you can run into trouble." Some overcaffeinated symptoms include insomnia, irritability, headaches, anxiety and fatigue.

What to do? Consider switching to tea, which contains less caffeine yet can still give you a boost in the morning or afternoon. And get moving, says Dr. Peeke. "Doing physical activity, especially if it's intense, can rev up a woman's norepinephrine (adrenaline) and energize her." Also, when you need a boost, try having a glass of cold water&mdashnature's gentle way of energizing your body! Photo: Shutterstock

Reason #8: Little to Look Forward To

Everyone deals with peaks and valleys in their lives, but if your life consists of more valleys than peaks right now, it could affect your motivation, happiness and even energy. "You might be tired and dispirited because you don't have anything to look forward to," says Caroline Miller, MAPP, a life coach and the author of Creating Your Best Life. "Happy people tend to have a 'savoring' personality, which means that they often are anticipating pleasurable events, and their calendars are studded with parties, mini-trips, and outings with people who make them smile."

What to do? If you don't have much happening on the horizon, consider doing some goal-setting. "The happiest among us always wake up to clear-cut, challenging goals, according to groundbreaking research published in 2008," says Miller. "It's important that the goals take us out of our comfort zone, because efforts to accomplish those goals are what we tend to value most at the end of the day, and that elevates our self-esteem." Photo: Shutterstock



Comments:

  1. Tohy

    I am sorry, that has interfered... At me a similar situation. Is ready to help.

  2. Dainos

    Not to everybody. I know.

  3. Vudolar

    Very well, that well comes to an end.



Write a message